Category Archives: Legislation

HB 983 – North Carolina’s Medical Marijuana Bill (2016)

North Carolina’s newest Medical Marijuana bill is making its way through House subcommittees. It is titled “Legalize and Tax Medical Marijuana”.

On April 26, 2016 Rep. Kelly Alexander introduced HB 983. This bill, if passed, would make it legal for patients to possess marijuana for personal use. This bill currently has a total of 12 sponsors – 11 Democrats and one Republican.

This year’s medical marijuana bill protects patients who are in possession of cannabis. Medical marijuana would be legal to have if a patient has documentation from a licensed physician and has paid all applicable taxes.

There are no provisions for growing or buying medical marijuana from a dispensary with this bill.

Here are the basics of HB 983…

Qualifying Criteria to possess marijuana with THC legally in North Carolina:

  • Patient must be diagnosed with a terminal or chronic illness
  • Patients must have a physician’s written recommendation for the patient to use cannabis to treat the disease’s underlying symptoms
  • Patients must purchase a Marijuana Tax Stamp from the NC Department of Revenue (Note: Marijuana tax stamps are already available for purchase today.)
  • Marijuana must only be for the patient’s personal use.
  • No more than three ounces of marijuana may be possessed at a given time.

 

Taxation Rates

  • Marijuana stalks and stems are taxed at a rate of $8.00 per ounce
  • Plus an additional…
    • $7.08 per ounce, if the marijuana is less than 5% THC by weight
    • $14.15 per ounce, if the marijuana is between 5% and 10% THC
    • $21.24 per ounce, if the marijuana is between 10% and 15% THC
    • $28.32 per ounce, if the marijuana is between 15% and 20% THC
    • $35.40 per ounce, if the marijuana is between 20% and 25% THC
    • $42.48 per ounce, if the marijuana is great than 25% THC.

According to an April, 2016 Public Policy Polling survey, 74% of North Carolinians support a doctor’s right to recommend marijuana to patients who may benefit from the plant.

Everyone in North Carolina who has a personal need for medical cannabis or knows someone who has benefited from treating their conditions with cannabis are highly encouraged to contact their representatives. Medical marijuana bills have not gained much traction in the North Carolina General Assembly. Through polling of representatives, the reason all previous medical marijuana bills have failed is largely due to the fact that our legislators do not know cannabis is safe and effective. They need to be informed.

Please contact your representative to encourage him or her to co-sponsor HB 983. If you don’t know who your representative is, read this article….

https://ncnorml.com/2015/01/29/who-represents-me-in-north-carolinas-state-congress/

 

If you already know who represents you in state congress, the following is a guide for reaching out and encouraging them to support this bill.

https://ncnorml.com/2015/03/07/contacting-your-legislator-about-legalizing-cannabis-in-north-carolina/
If you do not agree with the laws, do your part to change them.

NC is a Decrim State – But What Does that REALLY Mean?

In some states and municipalities that have ‘decriminalized’ possession of small amounts of cannabis, the offense is treated as an infraction and people may be given a ticket to pay, just as if they had been caught speeding.

In North Carolina, possession of any amount of cannabis up to 1 ½ ounces is classed as a misdemeanor, and possession of more than 1 ½ ounces is a felony. North Carolina is considered to be a ‘decriminalized’ state because first time offenders possessing ½ ounce or less are subject to a $200 fine and will not serve time, however, the person will still be arrested, and will have a record. Persons in possession of up to 1 ½ ounces may be sentenced to 1 – 45 days jail time and pay a $1000 fine.

For a detailed synopsis of North Carolina law and penalties, see http://norml.org/laws/item/north-carolina-penalties-2

To learn more about the history of decriminalization (and other cannabis-related legislation) in NC, see https://ncnorml.com/2015/10/02/a-brief-history-of-cannabis-legislation-in-north-carolina-from-1977-to-2015/

If you do not agree with the prohibition of cannabis and current laws, we ask that you do your part to change them. To learn more about how to change North Carolina’s cannabis laws, see https://ncnorml.com/2015/03/07/contacting-your-legislator-about-legalizing-cannabis-in-north-carolina

 

A Brief History of Cannabis Legislation in North Carolina from 1977 to 2015

During the 1970’s, lawmakers across the country were faced with an explosion of arrests for marijuana possession. Many legislators were especially concerned that young people from good families would live under the cloud of a felony record for the sole crime of possessing a few joints. In 1977, North Carolina decriminalized possession of marijuana making a first time offense of possession of up to one ounce a misdemeanor with a suspended sentence and a $100.00 fine.

Albert DiChiara and John F. Galliher covered the history of decriminalization in 11 states, including North Carolina in “Dissonance and Contradictions in the Origins of Marihuana Decriminalization” in Law & Society Review, Vol. 28, No. 1. (1994), pp. 41-78.

In 1977 NC legislators debated both a liquor-by-the drink bill and a marijuana decriminalization bill. Editorials in most of the state’s newspapers came out strongly against liquor-by-the drink, and that bill was returned to committee until the short session. In the few papers that covered the decriminalization bill, editorial opinion was mixed. Newspapers noted that since the mid-1960s, drug use was increasing in the state’s colleges, and that marijuana use was even more common among whites than among African Americans. The press reported on “High Noon” at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill where hundreds of students gathered at noon to smoke marijuana at the campus bell tower.

One senator quipped that in Rose Hill “…you can make corn liquor but with a joint you’re going to jail for two years. After football games in the Bell Tower at Chapel Hill as many as 15,000 smoked marihuana with the State Bureau of Investigation, local and county police watching. Do the same thing in Anderson, North Carolina, in the mountains and you were gone.”

Another senator stated, “Last summer my nephew was busted for smoking marihuana . . . and due to the fact that maybe I’ve got somebody with clout over there, this kid got off fairly easily.” In contrast he told the story of another “young boy” who went to prison for possession and was murdered during his incarceration. Another senator observed: “I do not believe that the majority of the people of North Carolina support the concept that fifty or sixty kids in North Carolina ought to be imprisoned for doing what thousands of others have done without any punishment at all”.

The director of the Department of Corrections testified on overcrowding in the state’s prisons, and testified that there should be no imprisonment for alcohol and drug violations. A state commission confirmed that the state prisons were overcrowded and that the state faced the threat of federal court intervention and control. One judge said “When drug use was restricted to young hippies, we could talk about THEM. When it hits the neighbor down the street, it’s US. It’s not what we can do about THEM, now it’s what we can do for US.”

Given all these concerns, a Democratic state representative urged the attorney general to support a decriminalization bill. In July 1977 the attorney general finally came out in support of the bill, justifying it as a means of concentrating on hard drug sales, relieving prison crowding, and of avoiding placing kids in prison with “professional felons.” HB 1325 was passed in the House by a vote of 59-36.

After that change however, North Carolina legislators seemed reluctant to enact further changes regarding marijuana, and some lawmakers during the Reagan era even proposed bills to turn back this modest level of decriminalization. A search of bills on ncleg.net reveals an interesting history of legislative proposals (bills proposed but not passed unless otherwise noted) between 1989 and 2015. The first medical marijuana bill was introduced in 2001, 24 years after the decriminalization bill was enacted into law.

1989 – 1990 Session:

House Bill 1090, Short Title: Possess Marijuana/Increase Penalty sponsored by Democrats Dennis Wicker, George Miller, Jr. and Beverly Perdue – proposed increasing the fine for possession of under ½ ounce to $500.00 and adding no less than 24 hours of community service. Referred to Judiciary Committee, then postponed indefinitely.

1991 – 1992 Session:

Senate Bill 366, Short Title: Marijuana Trafficking sponsored by Republicans John Carter and Robert Carpenter – proposed that possession of 10 pounds of marijuana or 100 plants would be guilty of a felony known as trafficking in marijuana with prison sentences of 5 years and fines of $5,000.00. (The previous limit was 50 pounds). Referred to Judiciary 2.

House Bill 470, Short Title: Marijuana User Accountability sponsored by Republican Coy Privette – proposed increasing the fine for a first conviction to $500.00 and a minimum sentence of no less than 24 hours, which would be suspended only if the defendant performed 8 hours of community service. Referred to Judiciary III.

1993 – 1994 Session:

House Bill 1550 / Senate Bill 1413, Short Title: Increase Penalty for Drug Sales sponsored by Democrat E. David Redwine (multiple cosponsors) in the House and Democrats David Parnell and Charles Alberton in the Senate – Specified that the transfer of less than 5 grams of marijuana for no remuneration would not constitute a delivery. Referred to committees in House and Senate.

1995 – 1996 Session:

House Bill 961, Short Title: Drug Offense Penalties sponsored by Jerry Braswell – proposed that possession of 10 pounds of marijuana or 100 plants would be guilty of a felony known as trafficking in marijuana with prison sentences of 5 years and fines of $5,000.00. Referred to Judiciary II Committee.

Senate Bill 625, Short Title: Change Marijuana Trafficking Amounts sponsored by Republican Patrick Ballentine (multiple cosponsors) – proposed that possession of 10 pounds of marijuana or 100 plants would be guilty of a felony known as trafficking in marijuana with prison sentences of 5 years and fines of $5,000.00. (The previous limit was 50 pounds). Referred to Judiciary 1.

1997 – 1998 Session:

Multiple bills introduced in General Assembly with bi-partisan sponsors or co-sponsors – proposing that possession of 10 pounds of marijuana or 100 plants would be guilty of a felony known as trafficking in marijuana with prison sentences of 5 years and fines of $5,000.00.

2001 – 2002 Session:

House Bill 1240, Short Title: Medical Use of Marijuana/Study, sponsored by Democrat Paul Luebke – proposed that the Legislative Research Commission may study the lawful possession, cultivation, and use of marijuana for the purpose of treating or alleviating pain or other symptoms associated with certain debilitating medical conditions. Referred to Rules Committee and postponed indefinitely. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2001/Bills/House/HTML/H1240v1.html

2003 – 2004 Session:

House Joint Resolution 1038, Short Title: Study Marijuana Use, sponsored by Democrat Paul Luebke – proposed that the Legislative Research Commission may study the lawful possession, cultivation, and use of marijuana for the purpose of treating or alleviating pain or other symptoms associated with certain debilitating medical conditions. Referred to Rules Committee. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2003/Bills/House/HTML/H1038v1.html

2005 – 2006 Session:

Senate Bill 1572, Short Title: Study Beneficial Uses of Industrial Hemp, sponsored by Republican Stan Bingham and Democrat Eleanor Kinnaird – proposed a Study Commission to Study the Industrial Uses of Industrial Hemp is created to study the many beneficial industrial uses of industrial hemp, including the use of industrial hemp oil as an alternative fuel and the use of industrial hemp fiber in construction and paper products; to study the economic opportunities industrial hemp provides to the State; and to consider the desirability and feasibility of authorizing industrial hemp cultivation and production as a farm product in North Carolina. Although this was incorporated into Session Law 2006-248 “The Studies Act of 2006” the commission was never formed. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2005/Bills/Senate/HTML/S1572v1.html

2007 – 2008 Session:

House Joint Resolution 2405, Short Title: LRC Study/Alternative Medicines, sponsored by Democrats Earl Jones, Walter Church, and Mary Price Harrison – proposed the Legislative Research Commission may study whether a public benefit would be derived from making it lawful for physicians to prescribe and patients to possess and use marijuana or its chemical equivalent for medicinal purposes only. Referred to Health Committee. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2007/Bills/House/HTML/H2405v1.html

2009 – 2010 Session:

House Bill 1380, Short Title: Medical Marijuana Act, sponsored/cosponsored by Democrats Earl Jones, Mary Price Harrison, Nick Mackey, Kelly Alexander, and Susan Fisher – proposed to make only those changes to existing North Carolina laws that are necessary to protect patients and their doctors from criminal and civil penalties and is not intended to change current civil and criminal laws governing the use of marijuana for nonmedical purposes. Referred to Health Committee. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2009/Bills/House/HTML/H1380v1.html

House Bill 1383, Short Title: Medical Marijuana Act/Referendum, sponsored by Democrat Earl Jones – proposed that the question of whether North Carolina should enact a Medical Marijuana Act allowing the possession and use of Marijuana for medical purposes only shall be submitted to the qualified voters of the State at a statewide election on the question held on November 3, 2009. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2009/Bills/House/HTML/H1383v1.html

2011 – 2012 Session:

House Bill 324, Short Title: Amend Possession of Marijuana, sponsored by Democrats Kelly Alexander and Larry Hall – proposed that possession of less than one ounce be treated as an infraction rather than a misdemeanor, and for “…person who was convicted of a Class 3 misdemeanor under G.S. 90-95(d)(4) for possession of marijuana before December 1, 2011, and who has not previously been convicted of any felony or misdemeanor other than a traffic violation under the laws of the United States or the laws of this State or any other state may, in the court where the person was convicted, file a petition for expunction of the offense from the person’s criminal record. The petition cannot be filed earlier than (i) two years after the date of the conviction or (ii) the completion of any period of probation, whichever occurs later.” Referred to Rules Committee. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2011/Bills/House/HTML/H324v1.html

House Bill 577, Short Title: Medical Cannabis Act, sponsored/co-sponsored by Democrats Kelly Alexander, Patsy Keever, Mary Price Harrison, Susan Fisher, and Paul Luebke, and Republican Glen Bradley – proposed to make only those changes to existing North Carolina laws that are necessary to protect patients and their doctors from criminal and civil penalties and is not intended to change current civil and criminal laws governing the use of marijuana for nonmedical purposes. Referred to Rules Committee. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2011/Bills/House/HTML/H577v1.html

2013 – 2014 Session:

House Bill 84, Short Title: Enact Medical Cannabis Act sponsored/cosponsored by Democrats Kelly Alexander, Mary Price Harrison, Kenneth Brandon, and Paul Luebke – proposed to make only those changes to existing North Carolina laws that are necessary to protect patients and their doctors from criminal and civil penalties and is not intended to change current civil and criminal laws governing the use of marijuana for nonmedical purposes. Referred to Rules Committee, which voted to terminate further discussion of the bill on 2/20/13. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2013/Bills/House/HTML/H84v1.html

House Bill 637, Short Title: Expunction of Marijuana Offense, sponsored/cosponsored by Democrats Kelly Alexander, Nathan Baskerville, Kenneth Brandon, Carla Cunningham, Beverly Earle, Susan Fisher, Susan Hamilton, Mary Price Harrison, Yvonne Lewis Holley, Annie Ward Mobley, Rodney W. Moore, and Bobbie Richardson – proposed that possession of less than one ounce be treated as an infraction rather than a misdemeanor, and for “…person who was convicted of a Class 3 misdemeanor under G.S. 90-95(d)(4) for possession of marijuana before December 1, 2013, and who has not previously been convicted of any felony or misdemeanor other than a traffic violation under the laws of the United States or the laws of this State or any other state may, in the court where the person was convicted, file a petition for expunction of the offense from the person’s criminal record. The petition cannot be filed earlier than (i) two years after the date of the conviction or (ii) the completion of any period of probation, whichever occurs later.” Referred to Judiciary Subcommittee B. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2013/Bills/House/HTML/H637v1.html

House Bill 1161, Short Title: Legalize Medical Marijuana/Const. Amendment, sponsored/cosponsored by Kelly Alexander, Carla Cunningham, Susan Hamilton, Mary Price Harrison, and Annie Ward Mobley – proposed that a constitutional amendment making medical use of marijuana legal shall be submitted to the qualified voters of the State at a statewide election on the question held on November 4, 2014. Referred to Judiciary Committee. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2013/Bills/House/HTML/H1161v1.html

House Bill 1220, Short Title: Hope 4 Hayley and Friends, sponsored by Republicans Patricia McElraft, Marilyn Avila, Jim Fulghum and Democrat Becky Carney with numerous bi-partisan supporters – proposed a pilot study program and registry to investigate the safety and efficacy of hemp extract in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Neurologists at UNC-Chapel Hill, East Carolina University, Wake Forest University and Duke University were encouraged to conduct studies and provide hemp extract of less than 0.3% THC by weight and least 10% cannabidiol by weight to patients with intractable epilepsy who enrolled in those studies. The Department of Health and Human Services was required to set up a registry of patients, caregivers and neurologists. The bill easily passed through the House and Senate and was signed into law (SL 2014-53) by Governor McCrory. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2013/Bills/House/HTML/H1220v7.html

2015 – 2016 Session:

House Bill 78, Short Title: Enact Medical Cannabis Act, sponsored/cosponsored by Democrats Kelly Alexander, Becky Carney, Mary Price Harrison, Carla Cunningham, John Ager, Jean Farmer-Butterfield, Susan Fisher, George Graham, Susi Hamilton, Yvonne Lewis Holley, Howard J. Hunter III, Paul Luebke, Rodney Moore, Garland Pierce, and Evelyn Terry – proposed to make only those changes to existing North Carolina laws that are necessary to protect patients and their doctors from criminal and civil penalties and is not intended to change current civil and criminal laws governing the use of marijuana for nonmedical purposes. Referred to Rules Committee, which voted to terminate further discussion of the bill on 3/25/15.

House Bill 317, Short Title: Medical Marijuana for Terminally Ill Patients, sponsored/cosponsored by Democrats Kelly Alexander, Becky Carney, Mary Price Harrison, Carla Cunningham, John Ager, Nathan Baskerville, Beverley Earle, Susan Fisher, George Graham, Susi Hamilton, Yvonne Lewis Holley, Howard J. Hunter III, Paul Luebke, Rodney Moore, Garland Pierce, and Evelyn Terry – proposed an exemption for terminally ill patients in hospice care. http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/Sessions/2015/Bills/House/HTML/H317v1.html

House Bill 766, Short Title: Amend CBD Oil Statute, sponsored/cosponsored by Republicans Patricia McElraft, Marilyn Avila, Brian Brown, Harry Warren, and Larry Yarborough, Democrats Kelly Alexander, Becky Carney, Susi Hamilton, Mary Price Harrison, Yvonne Lewis Holley, Rodney Moore, Michael Wray, and unaffiliated Paul Tine – proposed that board certified neurologists may recommend hemp extract containing less than 0.9% THC by weight and at least 5% cannabidiol by weight to patients with intractable epilepsy without enrolling in pilot studies, and that DHHS set up a database of patients, caregivers and neurologists rather than a registry. Passed both House and Senate and was signed into law (SL2015-154) by Governor McCrory. http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/Sessions/2015/Bills/House/PDF/H766v6.pdf

Senate Bill 313, Short Title: Industrial Hemp, sponsored/cosponsored by Republicans Stan Bingham and Ralph Hise and Democrat Joyce Waddell – proposed that it is in the best interest of the citizens of North Carolina to pro signature on 9/30/mote and encourage the development of an industrial hemp industry in the State in order to expand employment, promote economic activity, and provide opportunities to small farmers for an environmentally sustainable and profitable use of crop lands that might otherwise be lost to agricultural production. The purposes of this Article are to establish an agricultural pilot program for the cultivation of industrial hemp in the State, to provide for reporting on the program by growers and processors for agricultural or other research, and to pursue any federal permits or waivers necessary to allow industrial hemp to be grown in the State. Ratified and sent to Governor McCrory for signature on 9/30/15; became Session Law 2015-299 on 10/31/2015 without McCrory’s signature. http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2015/Bills/Senate/PDF/S313v5.pdf

Sources:

http://www.ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/SessionLaws/HTML/1977-1978/SL1977-862.html

http://www.mocavo.co.uk/Journal-of-the-House-of-Representatives-of-the-General-Assembly-of-the-State-of-North-Carolina-1977/437169/1171

http://www.epi.msu.edu/janthony/requests/articles/DiChiara_dissonance%20contradictions%20marihuana.pdf

http://scholarship.law.campbell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1002&context=clr

Updated CBD Bill Gives North Carolinians Limited Access to Medical Marijuana

The “North Carolina Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act” went into effect on August 1st 2015. Governor McCrory signed HB 766 into law two weeks earlier giving neurologists the authority to recommend low-THC cannabis oil to qualifying patients.

The law provides a legal exemption for caregivers of patients with intractable epilepsy to possess hemp extract under the following conditions:

  • The “hemp extract” means an extract from a cannabis plant, or a mixture or preparation containing cannabis plant material, that has all of the following characteristics:
  • Is composed of less than nine-tenths of one percent (0.9%) tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) by weight.
  • Is composed of at least five percent (5%) cannabidiol (CBD) by weight.
  • Contains no other psychoactive substance.
  • Possesses or uses the hemp extract only to treat intractable epilepsy.
  • Possesses, in close proximity to the hemp extract, a certificate of analysis that indicates the hemp extract’s ingredients, including its percentages of tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol by weight.
  • Is a caregiver. A caregiver is defined as an individual that is at least 18 years of age and a resident of North Carolina who is a parent, legal guardian, or custodian of a patient, who possesses a written statement dated and signed by a neurologist that states all of the following:
    1) The patient has been examined and is under the care of the neurologist;
    2) The patient suffers from intractable epilepsy;
    3) The patient may benefit from treatment with hemp extract.
  • The caregiver must be registered in a database to be established by the NC Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

The Intractable Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Database
The updated law requires that DHHS create a secure and electronic Intractable Epilepsy Alternative Treatment database registry for the registration of neurologists, caregivers, and patients. All caregivers shall be required to register with the Department. Law enforcement agencies are authorized to contact the Department to confirm a caregiver’s registration. The database shall consist of the following information to be provided by the caregivers at the time of registration:

  • The name and address of the caregiver.
  • The name and address of the caregiver’s patient.
  • The name, address, and hospital affiliation of the neurologist recommending hemp extract as an alternative treatment for intractable epilepsy for the patient.
  • If at any time following registration, the name, address, or hospital affiliation of the patient’s neurologist changes, the caregiver shall notify the Department and provide the Department with the patient’s new neurologist’s name, address, and hospital affiliation.

To enroll in the database…
Contact the Department of Health and Human Services Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services Division, Drug Control Unit.

Fquira Johannes:

919-733-2130

fquira.johannes@dhhs.nc.gov

Registration Form: NCEATA Registration Form

In an e-mail dated 7/31/2015, Rep. McElraft stated:
There is no age limit. The patient must have a note from a NC neurologist and intractable epilepsy in order to use this product legally in NC.  GW Pharma should have the Epidiolex approved within a year or two and then it should be covered by insurance.
Thanks Pat

Representative McElraft’s office notes that if the above conditions are met, caregivers should be careful about the source of the hemp extract, as some products may be superior to others. They suggested CW Hemp (the original creators of Charlotte’s Web CBD oil) which can be obtained through CWHemp.com.

Other sources of CBD oil include, but are not limited to,…

Palmetto Harmony
http://palmettoharmony.com/
This local company started in South Carolina by Janel Ralph.  She developed her company’s CBD products for her child with intractable epilepsy. Ms. Ralph stated that her company is able to ship their products, although they are not set up to do so on-line yet. She was recently named one of the 100 Most Influential Women in the cannabis industry by Skunk Magazine. She can be reached at 843-222-9322.

Mary’s Nutritionals
http://www.marysnutritionals.com/default.aspMary’s Nutritionals is operated as a legally separate, but identical sister company to Mary’s Medicinals. This Colorado based cannabis business has been given consistently high quality reviews. They test and report on the quality of their CBD products, all of which are shipped nationwide.
Graham Sorkin – Corporate Communications Specialist
818-268-4282
Graham@marysmedicinals.com

Excellent sources of information on cannabidiol are
Project CBD – http://www.projectcbd.org/

The North Carolina Medical Board lists 1,022 neurologists (some no longer actively practicing): http://wwwapps.ncmedboard.org/Clients/NCBOM/Public/LicenseeInformationResults.aspx

NC Senator Report Card – 2015 Medical Marijuana

The table below lists all the Senators in the General Assembly in 2015, and how they stand on allowing patients to have access to cannabis based on a doctor’s recommendation.

(Click here to see a report card for the Representatives in the General Assembly.)

Some of these Senators have shared their stance (in varying ways) on allowing doctors to recommend cannabis to patients in need. We have compiled the responses from these Senators and given them a grade.

If your Senator doesn’t have a grade, it means we don’t know how he or she stands on the issue. Please help the cause by calling, writing, emailing, or scheduling a face-to-face meeting today. Let us know what you found by emailing info@ncnorml.org.

Don’t know who your Senator is? Read this….
https://ncnorml.com/2015/01/29/who-represents-me-in-north-carolinas-state-congress/

NOTE: Scroll left and right in the embedded table to see the grade, political party, legislator’s name, district, counties, comments supporting the legislator’s grade, and supporting links.

NC Representative Report Card – 2015 Medical Marijuana

The table below lists all the representatives in the General Assembly in 2015 and how they stand on allowing patients to have access to cannabis based on a doctor’s recommendation.

(Click here to see a report card for the Senators in the General Assembly.)

Some of these Representatives have shared their stance on allowing doctors to recommend cannabis to patients in need. We have compiled the responses from these representatives and given them a grade.

If your representative doesn’t have a grade, it means we don’t know how he or she stands on the issue. Please help the cause by calling, writing, emailing, or scheduling a face-to-face meeting today. Let us know what you found by emailing info@ncnorml.org.

Don’t know who your representative is? Read this….
https://ncnorml.com/2015/01/29/who-represents-me-in-north-carolinas-state-congress/

NOTE: Scroll left and right in the embedded table to see the grade, political party, legislator’s name, district, counties, comments supporting the legislator’s grade, and supporting links.

Legislative Rally for Medical Marijuana in Raleigh – March 19, 2015

image - nc flag white marijuana leafOn Thursday March 19 NC NORML, NCCPN and activists from all parts of North Carolina and the South will be attending the annual Rally in Raleigh. By attending this event you are showing state congress that you are ready for them to pass a long overdue medical cannabis bill. A recent Public Policy Polling survey shows 70% of North Carolinians support a doctor’s right to prescribe medical cannabis.

Add this event to your Facebook Calendar.

There will be a formal presentation held in the main Legislative Auditorium with several speakers. (Details below) You are encouraged to contact your representative beforehand and let him or her know that this presentation about the value of medical marijuana is being held that day. Also NC NORML and NCCPN will be hosting a rally at Halifax Mall (the grassy courtyard between Legislation Office Buildings) from 10am to 3pm for supporters of cannabis legislation reform.

Contact your representative today. Schedule an appointment to speak with them. Most of the General Assembly is made up of conservatives that are traditionally closed minded about legalizing marijuana in any capacity. The thinking goes something like “Drugs are bad. Marijuana is a drug. End of story.” They are unfortunately loyal to outdated opinions that have no basis in science. Let them know medical doctors will be presenting at 11am. Politely and humbly ask them to join you in the auditorium for the evidence showing why patients should be allowed safe access to legal medical cannabis.

The program will include some of the following speakers:

– Representative Kelly Alexander: He has sponsored each of North Carolina’s medical marijuana bills, and this one too. He’ll say a few words about the legislation and what we can do to pass it.
– Dr. Kevin Baiko who is Board Certified in Cannabinoid Medicine and has current practices in Hawaii and Oregon. Dr. Baiko will take questions from legislators.
– Dr. (NP) Lee Porter who will present on the endocannabinoid system.
Also on hand will be Faculty Members of Patients Out of Time to answer questions. POT has presented all of the seminars for Doctors and other Health Care Professionals over the past decades. These seminars provide AMA certified recurrent training required for different professions.

If you do not agree with the current marijuana laws in North Carolina, it is important for you to attend. This is a numbers game. To demonstrate to the General Assembly that this issue matters, more people need to come out this year than ever before. Last year we had over 200. This year we hope to have hundreds more.

When will this presentation be held?
March 19, 2015 (Thursday)
Presentation begins at 10am .
Arrive early in the morning to meet with your Representative beforehand.
(Call for an appointment TODAY).
After you meet with your representative, gather with your peers in the Legislative Auditorium before the presentation begins.

Don’t know your Representative?
https://ncnorml.com/2015/01/29/who-represents-me-in-north-carolinas-state-congress/

Where will we meet?
North Carolina General Assembly
Legislative Building
16 West Jones St
Raleigh, North Carolina

What should I wear?
Dress like you’re going to church or an interview. It doesn’t have to be fancy, but should show you respect the institution of law and your willingness to do what’s needed to give patients safe access to marijuana.

Who should attend?
If you think and feel that a doctor has the right to prescribe medical marijuana, you need to come out and show your support. This event’s success depends on you. The passage of this bill will only happen if you and your friends and family come out to show support and contact your representative.

Help us get the word out. Take a day off from work and join hundreds of like-minded individuals who know it is time North Carolina showed compassion towards its citizens who are in need of their non-toxic, natural medicine.